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Sexy and They Know It: Sex Blogging and Jezebel

In addition to critiquing and altering its form, like discussed in the previous post, there has been a long history of the keeping of female’s body issues and sexual desires under wraps. However, new digital media, like Jezebel, are providing an outlet for these sexualized discussions. All of these different blogs promote a greater understanding and dialogue about women’s health and issues that have been traditionally taboo, from birth control, abortion to sexual desires and experience.

For sex blogs, it is often described that the Internet as one of true place that a woman can express her sexual wants and desires (Muise 2011: 416). Most of the dialogue on women and sexual desires is very heteronormative, and rests on the cultural standards that women should not talk about wanting or liking sex (Muise 2011:412). However, this is changing increasingly as culture becomes more sexualized and dialogue about women’s issues increased in media (Attwood 2009:7) These blogs are more “masculine” and “aggressive” as “they resist the sexual passivity that characterizes traditional feminine discourses” (Muise 2011: 416). Many of the blogs about women and sex on the internet are written in a single narrative format, and include accounts heteronormative to the point where many think they are written by men (Attwood 2009: 8). This is because socially these women are seen as writing male fantasies, and it is easier to imaging these pieces being male originating them imaging that females would express their feelings in such a way (Muise 2011: 412). The “entitlement to sexual pleasure” expressed in these blogs is “ consistent with a masculine version of sexuality” (Muise 2011: 414)

While there are some of these more personal account of sexual activity on Jezebel, there is less of an emphasis on personal encounters.  In a female targeted equivalent to the NCAA tournament, Jezebel held a “March Madness” bracket to compare chocolate to sex, with different types of chocolate and different sex positions as the competitors (Missionary Sex won over Brownies in the final round) At first, this aspect of Jezebel was more prominent, especially earlier in the site with very sexually open writer Tracy Egan who posts under the pseudonym Slut Machine. Egan posted details about her sex life. This sexual content reached its full saturation at the time of the  “Thinking and Drinking” incident, (which is described more here) when Egan and Moe Tkacik gave a very sexually charged speech, and said many things that people deemed highly offensive (Wazyn 2010: 11). During the event, which was ticketed and live-streamed, they demeaned rape victims (Egan: I think the reason I haven’t been raped, is cause I’m like smart) and downplayed the importance of safe sex (Tkacik: “Pulling out always works for me,” Egan: “ And I know this is irresponsible to say, it’s the most fun way not to get pregnant”(Wayzn 2010:12).

More recently, the sexual nature of Jezebel has been toned down. Egan, who now has a toddler, is more prone to write posts like this one about motherhood, on “How I Went from Being a Heartless Bitch to a Sappy Cry-Baby” (Egan 2012) There are still pccasionally personal accounts of sexual tales (such as this women who sold her underwear online to people with fetishes) However, looking at the bottom of these posts show that many of them have been aggregated from around the internet, originally sourced to other blogs.  The “sex” in Jezebel still has some element of actual sexual encounters, but has  evolved beyond the smaller scale personal blogs.

Sources:

Attwood, F. “Intimate Adventures: Sex Blogs, Sex `blooks’ and Women’s Sexual Narration.” European Journal of Cultural Studies 12.1 (2009): 5-20. Print.

Egan, Tracie. “How I Went from a Heartless Bitch to a Sappy Cry-Baby.” Jezebel. 19 Apr. 2012. Web. 22 Apr. 2012. <http://jezebel.com/5901791/how-i-went-from-a-heartless-bitch-to-a-sappy-cry-baby&gt;.

Helmsley, Fiona. “I Sold My Panties Online, and My Mom Found Out.” Jezebel. 3 Feb. 2012. Web. 22 Apr. 2012. <http://jezebel.com/5881749/i-sold-my-panties-online-and-my-mom-found-out&gt;.

Muise, Amy. “Women’s Sex Blogs: Challenging Dominant Discourses of Heterosexual Desire.” Feminism & Psychology 21.3 (2011): 411-19. Print.

Stewart, Dodai. “March Madness Sex vs. Chocolate: We Have A Winner!” Jezebel. 3 Apr. 2012. Web. 22 Apr. 2012. <http://jezebel.com/5898770/march-madness-sex-vs-chocolate-we-have-a-winner&gt;.

Wazny, Katelyn M. “Feminist Communities Online: What it means to be a Jezebel.” B Sides 8 (2010): 1- 23.

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